Some Advice On The Sensible Use Of Military Grade Supplements

Publié par hamza lion mardi 12 mai 2015

By Toni Vang


The ordinary diet contains all the nutrients that people need in their bodies. This is not always possible, however, and then they start to use nutritional supplements to substitute the missing nutrients in their diet. They may do this for two reasons - because they genuinely have a nutrient deficiency, or because they are trying to target a specific nutrient so that they can maximize the effect that it has in their metabolism. Military grade supplements are an option that should definitely be considered.

Soldiers have what is probably the most strenuous occupation physically. Their physical conditioning is second to none. They are trained to operate in practically any environment, under terrible conditions or in threatening situations. As part of the most basic military training, recruits are told to march in excess of 25 miles in a single day, transporting packs of about 50lb. Weaponry weighs more than 10lb per weapon.

This makes the supplements that they use of interest to people in other life situations too. Retail pharmacies only supply ordinary commercial supplements, and these do not necessarily have the same intensity of nutrient presence in them. Their commercial packaging is also expensive and adds to their price.

The choice of supplement also depends on what its user intends to use it for. There are different options in terms of supplement use, and the intended purpose also determines which one to use and what nutrient(s) to target. Then there are also basic guidelines for their use and how to decide on which one is the most appropriate.

Vitamin C is a common ingredient in supplements. There are tablets available which target this vitamin exclusively. Also known as ascorbic acid (but never in promotional material), it has two very important functions in the body. Firstly (and most advertised), it assists the immune system by providing protection against pathogens. It's also involved in tissue matrices where it adds to the strength of the tissue.

Those who are in a situation of compromised immunity should consider this supplement. Infections such as flu or colds are one example of such situations, as are conditions of deprivation, such as when the diet is decreased or living conditions are more extreme.

Another use of Vitamin C is to accelerate the healing of skin and soft tissue injuries. Since ascorbic acid is involved in the generation and repair of these tissues, using a supplement can cause them to heal faster and better. Vitamin A (retinol) is also useful for this purpose. Using a Vitamin A supplement might cause the skin to become noticeably healthier. Incidentally, Vitamin A is present in the eye's retina (the part at the back that is sensitive to light) and in the liver. It's toxic in large doses.

Using a supplement should be just that - supplementary. They should not be relied on as a staple part of the diet. Some nutrients can potentially be taken in overdose amounts, while others start to alter the metabolism over time. Taken for too long, they can cause negative symptoms when they are stopped. The user should never develop dependency on a supplement. They should rather be taken for specific purposes for relatively shorter periods of time.




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mardi 12 mai 2015

Some Advice On The Sensible Use Of Military Grade Supplements

Posted by hamza lion 07:53, under | No comments

By Toni Vang


The ordinary diet contains all the nutrients that people need in their bodies. This is not always possible, however, and then they start to use nutritional supplements to substitute the missing nutrients in their diet. They may do this for two reasons - because they genuinely have a nutrient deficiency, or because they are trying to target a specific nutrient so that they can maximize the effect that it has in their metabolism. Military grade supplements are an option that should definitely be considered.

Soldiers have what is probably the most strenuous occupation physically. Their physical conditioning is second to none. They are trained to operate in practically any environment, under terrible conditions or in threatening situations. As part of the most basic military training, recruits are told to march in excess of 25 miles in a single day, transporting packs of about 50lb. Weaponry weighs more than 10lb per weapon.

This makes the supplements that they use of interest to people in other life situations too. Retail pharmacies only supply ordinary commercial supplements, and these do not necessarily have the same intensity of nutrient presence in them. Their commercial packaging is also expensive and adds to their price.

The choice of supplement also depends on what its user intends to use it for. There are different options in terms of supplement use, and the intended purpose also determines which one to use and what nutrient(s) to target. Then there are also basic guidelines for their use and how to decide on which one is the most appropriate.

Vitamin C is a common ingredient in supplements. There are tablets available which target this vitamin exclusively. Also known as ascorbic acid (but never in promotional material), it has two very important functions in the body. Firstly (and most advertised), it assists the immune system by providing protection against pathogens. It's also involved in tissue matrices where it adds to the strength of the tissue.

Those who are in a situation of compromised immunity should consider this supplement. Infections such as flu or colds are one example of such situations, as are conditions of deprivation, such as when the diet is decreased or living conditions are more extreme.

Another use of Vitamin C is to accelerate the healing of skin and soft tissue injuries. Since ascorbic acid is involved in the generation and repair of these tissues, using a supplement can cause them to heal faster and better. Vitamin A (retinol) is also useful for this purpose. Using a Vitamin A supplement might cause the skin to become noticeably healthier. Incidentally, Vitamin A is present in the eye's retina (the part at the back that is sensitive to light) and in the liver. It's toxic in large doses.

Using a supplement should be just that - supplementary. They should not be relied on as a staple part of the diet. Some nutrients can potentially be taken in overdose amounts, while others start to alter the metabolism over time. Taken for too long, they can cause negative symptoms when they are stopped. The user should never develop dependency on a supplement. They should rather be taken for specific purposes for relatively shorter periods of time.




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