The Increase In Concussion Treatment In Toronto Hockey Players

Publié par hamza lion vendredi 10 juillet 2015

By Jana Serrano


Reports are coming out of the Canadian province of Ontario indicating that the incidence of head injuries has gone up. Between the years 2003 and 2010, numbers of young people turning up in hospitals for concussion treatment in Toronto went up 50 percent. While this may be an indication that parents are becoming better informed about the risk of head injury, the increase is still cause for concern.

A world-renouned clinic in Massachusetts defines concussion as a traumatic brain injury that changes the way the brain functions. The effects may include headache, difficulty concentrating and problems with balance, coordination and memory. Even the mildest injury can cause permanent changes to the brain. The most common cause is a bump on the head, with or without loss of consciousness, although they can also occur as the result of rigorous shaking of the head and upper torso.

The symptoms may not express themselves for several days, weeks or longer after the original blow. These include headache, confusion and memory loss. Additionally, there may be nausea and vomiting, ringing sounds in the ears, a feeling of pressure within the head, seeing stars or slurred speech. Children and toddlers may lose interest in their favorite toys, appear cranky or irritable, cry more than normal or change their sleeping and eating habits.

A trauma to the head does not have to seem serious in order to cause serious brain injury. Many sports players, when injured, insist on continuing to play after receiving a blow to the head. Sadly, this can end in tragedy, as the death of British actress Natasha Richardson, shortly after refusing treatment for a bump on the head while skiing.

Young men and women who take part in rigorous contact sports are especially vulnerable to concussive head injury, especially those who play hockey. This is because a routine defense move in hockey is what is called a bodycheck. This is when a defensive player rams into an opponent at high speed in an effort to deflect the puck and increase ticket sales. This maneuver is only permitted against the player who actually has the puck.

Bodychecking was outlawed in 2010 in order to protect younger players from suffering concussions from a body check to the head. However, this strategy does not appear to be working. Not only are the overall numbers of concussions on the increase, but women are receiving more head injuries than the guys.

It turns out it is not just female hockey players who are getting more brain injuries, it is women in all sports and at all ages, from pro to college and even down to girls of nine or ten years old. Pee wee coaches are reporting more concussions among their players. In spite of the fact that women's hockey does not permit bodychecking, the incidence of concussions among these players is on the rise.

A chief neurosurgeon at a hospital in Massachusetts suggests that women may be more susceptible to concussions than men and that this merits further study. This increased vulnerability may be because women do not train their neck muscles as aggressively as do men. Higher rates may also indicate that women are more honest about reporting their head injuries.




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vendredi 10 juillet 2015

The Increase In Concussion Treatment In Toronto Hockey Players

Posted by hamza lion 16:25, under | No comments

By Jana Serrano


Reports are coming out of the Canadian province of Ontario indicating that the incidence of head injuries has gone up. Between the years 2003 and 2010, numbers of young people turning up in hospitals for concussion treatment in Toronto went up 50 percent. While this may be an indication that parents are becoming better informed about the risk of head injury, the increase is still cause for concern.

A world-renouned clinic in Massachusetts defines concussion as a traumatic brain injury that changes the way the brain functions. The effects may include headache, difficulty concentrating and problems with balance, coordination and memory. Even the mildest injury can cause permanent changes to the brain. The most common cause is a bump on the head, with or without loss of consciousness, although they can also occur as the result of rigorous shaking of the head and upper torso.

The symptoms may not express themselves for several days, weeks or longer after the original blow. These include headache, confusion and memory loss. Additionally, there may be nausea and vomiting, ringing sounds in the ears, a feeling of pressure within the head, seeing stars or slurred speech. Children and toddlers may lose interest in their favorite toys, appear cranky or irritable, cry more than normal or change their sleeping and eating habits.

A trauma to the head does not have to seem serious in order to cause serious brain injury. Many sports players, when injured, insist on continuing to play after receiving a blow to the head. Sadly, this can end in tragedy, as the death of British actress Natasha Richardson, shortly after refusing treatment for a bump on the head while skiing.

Young men and women who take part in rigorous contact sports are especially vulnerable to concussive head injury, especially those who play hockey. This is because a routine defense move in hockey is what is called a bodycheck. This is when a defensive player rams into an opponent at high speed in an effort to deflect the puck and increase ticket sales. This maneuver is only permitted against the player who actually has the puck.

Bodychecking was outlawed in 2010 in order to protect younger players from suffering concussions from a body check to the head. However, this strategy does not appear to be working. Not only are the overall numbers of concussions on the increase, but women are receiving more head injuries than the guys.

It turns out it is not just female hockey players who are getting more brain injuries, it is women in all sports and at all ages, from pro to college and even down to girls of nine or ten years old. Pee wee coaches are reporting more concussions among their players. In spite of the fact that women's hockey does not permit bodychecking, the incidence of concussions among these players is on the rise.

A chief neurosurgeon at a hospital in Massachusetts suggests that women may be more susceptible to concussions than men and that this merits further study. This increased vulnerability may be because women do not train their neck muscles as aggressively as do men. Higher rates may also indicate that women are more honest about reporting their head injuries.




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