Tips On How To Get Thick African American Hair

Publié par hamza lion mercredi 2 septembre 2015

By Kenya England


Anyone who steps back a few decades into the past will find a world in which the hair of a black woman is looked down on. But it is also quite obvious that things are changing swiftly in the modern world. The natural curly and coiled tresses movement has encouraged many women of African decent to appreciate their curls more than they did before. This has given birth to a quest for knowledge on how to get thick African American hair.

The first option that many natural sisters choose to thicken their locks is to treat it. Treatment is done by mixing nutritious solutions and applying them to the hair. The solution is allowed to soak into the follicles for periods of thirty minutes or more. The combination that is used is usually dependent on the research that the woman has done and the products that are available or in season.

One popular ingredient for these deep treatments is Aloe Vera. This plant is known globally for its many health benefits that range from internal support for the body as well as skin and hair health. The inside part of the plant is removed and rubbed onto the head with attention being paid to the scalp and the strands. It is then allowed to stay there for about thirty minutes before it is rinsed off.

Coconut oil is another home remedy that is used to thicken the curly locks of African American women. Coconut oil is similar to Aloe Vera in that it has been linked with health benefits for many years. Preference is given to virgin coconut oil as it is said to possess high amounts of nutrients.

Among the locks enhancing concoctions used to promote thickness is a popular tropical food, avocado. The ripe fruit is massaged onto the head and allowed to deposit its thickening and health promoting benefits before it is rinsed off. Many users of this fruit combine it with other beneficial ingredients such as eggs, or ripened bananas.

Castor oil, an old Jamaican remedy is also used for thickening and strengthening the African American strands. Castor oil is produces by the seeds of the Castor bean plant and has been used for centuries by Jamaicans and others to promote health. Those who use castor oil for their tresses often blend it with other oils such as coconut oil.

These women also pay attention to the nutrients in their body with a view to improving the health and thickness of their curly tresses. They focus on improving their intake of nutrients such as folic acid which is known for its ability to promote cell division and multiplication. It is not difficult to see how this nutrient can help the locks which, essentially are made up of cells, to multiply.

In addition to deep treatment, women with curly or coiled hair wear hairstyles that are expected to promote thickness. These are known as protective styles since they protect the tresses by reducing or eliminating the need for manipulation. These types of styles include weaves, wigs and twists.




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mercredi 2 septembre 2015

Tips On How To Get Thick African American Hair

Posted by hamza lion 08:52, under | No comments

By Kenya England


Anyone who steps back a few decades into the past will find a world in which the hair of a black woman is looked down on. But it is also quite obvious that things are changing swiftly in the modern world. The natural curly and coiled tresses movement has encouraged many women of African decent to appreciate their curls more than they did before. This has given birth to a quest for knowledge on how to get thick African American hair.

The first option that many natural sisters choose to thicken their locks is to treat it. Treatment is done by mixing nutritious solutions and applying them to the hair. The solution is allowed to soak into the follicles for periods of thirty minutes or more. The combination that is used is usually dependent on the research that the woman has done and the products that are available or in season.

One popular ingredient for these deep treatments is Aloe Vera. This plant is known globally for its many health benefits that range from internal support for the body as well as skin and hair health. The inside part of the plant is removed and rubbed onto the head with attention being paid to the scalp and the strands. It is then allowed to stay there for about thirty minutes before it is rinsed off.

Coconut oil is another home remedy that is used to thicken the curly locks of African American women. Coconut oil is similar to Aloe Vera in that it has been linked with health benefits for many years. Preference is given to virgin coconut oil as it is said to possess high amounts of nutrients.

Among the locks enhancing concoctions used to promote thickness is a popular tropical food, avocado. The ripe fruit is massaged onto the head and allowed to deposit its thickening and health promoting benefits before it is rinsed off. Many users of this fruit combine it with other beneficial ingredients such as eggs, or ripened bananas.

Castor oil, an old Jamaican remedy is also used for thickening and strengthening the African American strands. Castor oil is produces by the seeds of the Castor bean plant and has been used for centuries by Jamaicans and others to promote health. Those who use castor oil for their tresses often blend it with other oils such as coconut oil.

These women also pay attention to the nutrients in their body with a view to improving the health and thickness of their curly tresses. They focus on improving their intake of nutrients such as folic acid which is known for its ability to promote cell division and multiplication. It is not difficult to see how this nutrient can help the locks which, essentially are made up of cells, to multiply.

In addition to deep treatment, women with curly or coiled hair wear hairstyles that are expected to promote thickness. These are known as protective styles since they protect the tresses by reducing or eliminating the need for manipulation. These types of styles include weaves, wigs and twists.




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